ANY EMERGENCY REQUIRING AID CALL 000

The operator will co-ordinate mobilisation of Ambulance, Police, Fire, Rescue Vessel, Club etc.

FOR NON-MEDICAL SITUATIONS ENDANGERING OTHER CLUB MEMBERS

(especially within the Club)

Eildon Boat Club BH 5774 2040

EBC General Manager AH 0407 742 040

Useful Telephone Numbers

Pharmacy Eildon 5774 2626

Alexandra Hospital 5772 0900

Alexandra Vet 5772 1600

Alexandra Medical Centre 5772 1444

WHAT TO DO AS PREPARATION… PLEASE READ THIS

When an accident occurs or is impending there is no time! The victim, be it friend, child, spouse or pet, is dependent on the right decision. How would you feel if you made the wrong choice?

BUY A FIRST AID BOOK AND READ IT … Better still, enrol in a first aid course, it could save a family members life. Emergencies do occur. Nobody is immune. Each year people are maimed or killed as potentially there are many dangers. Being aware and prepared minimises the effects and trauma.

All houseboats should carry an appropriate First Aid Kit and Manual. See web e.g. St John’s Ambulance, Red Cross. A great game to play with kids is……..”What if?” i.e. What if Liam fell overboard? What would you do??

EMERGENCY

DO NOT PANIC OR RUSH INTO A SITUATION. OBTAIN HELP FIRST.

  • Compile a precise message before sending EXACTLY where you are – and any localising landmarks.
  • Type of incident – e.g. jet-ski accident, a tree fell on the victim.
  • Time of incident.
  • How many injured.
  • Type and severity of injuries – e.g. severe campfire burn to the face, trauma from ski-rope wrapped around the arm.
  • Assistance required – quick estimation. 000 will assess the options if you provide enough details. They will extract the information they need so do not be reticent.
  • Any other relevant factors, e.g., ease of access, petrol spill, gas bottles.

ANSWER ALL QUESTIONS CALMLY

Know the number, if possible, of the telephone you are ringing from. Land lines can be traced. 000 may need to contact you further. Some mobiles provide latitude and longitude.

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE RESPONSE IS DEPENDENT ON THE INITIAL MESSAGE

Assessment of an Medical Emergency

Remember these: D R A B C D

D = Danger

After assessing the hazards to the victim (and the helper) clear them away.

R = Response

Determine appropriate action to be taken – most severe cases, which can be helped, first.

A = Airway

Check that there is a clear airway.

B = Breathing

Plan to give “expired air ventilation” (usually “mouth to mouth”) if the patient is not breathing.

+ C = Circulation

Check if no pulse. If not, then commence cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Do not wait until there is an accident to know where the Carotid and Femoral pulses are – Your child may depend on this!

D = Deadly Bleeding

Check for bleeding – external (under clothes) and possible internal bleeding.

WHEN THIS HAS BEEN PERFORMED

ACTION: NON-MEDICAL, FIRE, EXPLOSION

Ring 000. Fires on boats are extremely dangerous.

COMMENCE FIRST AID

Remember you are dealing with people. Reassurance is paramount. Don’t say anything that may panic them. Where possible. Ask consent to examine the patient. Be aware of communication and language differences, modesty and privacy, gender, personal and physical contact. Infection – be aware of transmission to or from the victim, the helper or the environment.

COMMENCE FIRST AID

Remember you are dealing with people. Reassurance is paramount. Don’t say anything that may panic them. Where possible. Ask consent to examine the patient. Be aware of communication and language differences, modesty and privacy, gender, personal and physical contact. Infection – be aware of transmission to or from the victim, the helper or the environment.

BLEEDING

Severe, life-threatening bleeding is rare but can result from propeller blades, etc. If a ‘Spurter’ is present, then place a clean pad directly over it and apply firm pressure. When larger blood vessels are involved, you may have to ‘pinch’ the vessel with your fingers. Continue to apply one dressing over the next until the bleeding is controlled, and then leave them intact until aid arrives. NEVER use a tourniquet unless as a last resort!! Lesser lacerations are dressed with a pad and a firm bandage. If a penetrating foreign body is present, then leave this intact and bandage around the object. “Internal bleeding must be considered, especially if the victim is shocked for no apparent reason. Usually caused by a moderately severe blunt injury especially to the chest, abdomen or thigh. i.e. jet ski or boating accident, serious fall,  punch….”

BURNS

There are many causes of burns, and each must be assessed before commencing treatment; i.e. in electric burns switch off the power, burning clothes must be extinguished, etc. Immediately cover the area with cool water. NEVER use creams or lotions. Remove any jewellery or clothing unless it is stuck to the wound. Apply a NON-STICK dressing to the area and request help. If the patient is conscious, then small sips of water will help. For any burn greater than a twenty cent piece, or if in doubt, obtain professional advice.

SUNBURN

Because of the usual vast areas covered this requires special mention. Areas of blistering, as above need medical assistance.Large red areas require cooling, drinking plenty of fluids (never alcohol), specially prepared water soluble preparations from the chemist after blistering has been ruled out and rest in a cooler area. Beware of heat exhaustion and also hypothermia from over cooling. This is particularly so in young children and babies. Vomiting and persistent headache require attention.

FRACTURES

All fractures will need professional assistance. Immobilise and support the affected area until the patient can be taken to the hospital. If the bone protrudes through the skin, then a non-stick dressing should be applied. “Pain relief should be given by paramedics.”

SOFT TISSUE INJURIES

Most soft tissue injuries are treated by R.I.C.E.

R = Rest the area involved

I = Ice should be applied through a towel or similar covering for twenty minutes maximum and repeated several times during the day.

C = Compression, bandage to support the affected area and to resist swelling

E = Elevation, keep the limb raised above the point where it attaches to the trunk. Depending on the severity, professional help may be sought.

FRACTURES

All fractures will need professional assistance. Immobilise and support the affected area until the patient can be taken to the hospital. If the bone protrudes through the skin, then a non-stick dressing should be applied. “Pain relief should be given by paramedics.”

SHOCK

This condition is caused by many severe traumatic problems. Symptoms include cold, clammy skin, sickness and giddiness, fast, shallow breathing and pulse, anxiety and confusion and thirst. These people LOOK sick.

  • Seek medical advice
  • Lie patient as for faint and cover with a blanket
  • Treat cause if visible and possible
  • Loosen tight clothing
  • If conscious and diabetes possible give sugar drink
  • Provide constant reassurance

UNCONSCIOUSNESS

Assess the cause of unconsciousness, if obvious, and apply D R A B C D. Roll patient onto their side to unconscious position taking care of supporting the neck and spine if an njury is suspected. Seek urgent help.

Prevention is always the best. Accidents will happen, so we all must be prepared.
Have a first aid kit
Buy a St. John Ambulance book and read it!!
Be current with Tetanus vaccination.